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          THE  UNKNOWN  JANE  AUSTEN 

       

                                by Nigel King 

Nigel King Copyright  2018-2021                                                                                                           

Author’s Note                                                                                                                                     

Easter Egg definitions

1) An artificial chocolate or hard boiled decorated egg given at Easter   

                                                                                             

2) An unexpected or undocumented feature in a piece of computer software or on a DVD included as a joke or bonus, ( this definition has come to include jokes etc in art for example the recently discovered initials LV and the date 1495 in the Mona Lisa  or the loaves in The Last Supper also by Leonardo Da Vinci, that a musician realised could also be musical notation for a 40 second requiem.   

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

                                                                    I N T R O D U C T I O N 

Jane Austen is thought by the literary world to be second only to the great William Shakespeare.  I think that position will change soon, as more understanding of the results of my research become more widely known.  I fully expect that one day soon her works will be viewed as the very equal of Shakespeare but and this point is crucial, different.  Indeed there may even be a case for saying that in some ways she is perhaps the superior.  I assume rightly or wrongly that the reader is familiar both with her work and life.

 

From my research:  

 

I claim to have discovered the real life identity of the  man who inspired Mr.  Darcy,  of Pride and Prejudice fame, perhaps the most famous hero in literature. 

I claim to have discovered the real  life location of Thornton Lacey.  It is a real village in Northampton  where the man I think was  Mr.  Darcy lived  on an estate initially rented in 1795 and purchased in 1799 for 42, 000 pounds. 

I claim to have discovered the real life location of Northanger Abbey.  It was owned by a cousin of the man I think was Mr.  Darcy.  A man who coincidentally? was a colonel just like  Darcy's cousin Colonel Fitzwilliam.

The man I think was Darcy  absolutely must have known  Hertfordshire very well, a place Jane Austen never visited yet wrote about.  He owned an estate close to Ware the town thought by many to be the location of Meryton and  which was also well within 10 miles of The Great North Road  (see Pride and Prejudice for the significance of 10 miles).

 

This man also knew some members of the Duke of Devonshire's family who owned Chatsworth House, often thought to be the inspiration for Pemberley.

 

He  knew Gracechurch Street  (where the Gardiners lived) very well, visiting it on several occasions in  the early 1790's where, as a set of accounts compiled by his friend show, he spent (perhaps even squandered)  many hundreds of pounds on several occasions at Number 2 Gracechurch Street Spinks and Co and other select establishments nearby. 

Whilst I cannot positively state examples of one degree of separation between Jane Austen herself and the man I think was Mr.  Darcy; that does not mean they never existed.  There are however  some examples of one degree of separation between this man and  close members of Jane Austen's  immediate  family.    However it is  quite possible, likely even  that Jane Austen herself  knew this man's only sibling! a sister! a sister worth  30,000!  (just like Darcy's sister) who was married  to a Senior Prebendary well known to the man I think was Mr. Darcy  as indeed was another brother of the aforementioned who was  also a Senior Prebendary at Winchester Cathedral.   These two men were surely known to her father.

 

Almost everything that Jane Austen tells us about Mr.  Darcy  apply to this man beginning with the fact that in 1795 when Jane Austen began Pride and Prejudice he was a young, very rich, single man.    

I claim to have discovered a quantity of puns in her work.  Prior to 2020 only ONE was known.

I claim to have discovered an extraordinary number of anagram puzzles within her work.

I claim to have discovered some number puzzles within her work.

I claim to be able to offer an explanation of "sans peur et sans reproche,"  The use by Jane Austen of the name Austin spelt with an I,  The origin for the pseudonym  Ashton Dennis,  the origin of the name  Pemberley and a little more besides....

 

I also have explanations for the origins of the fictional names of Mansfield as in Mansfield Park ,Thornton Lacey, Northanger Abbey Pemberley (especially clever) the pseudonym used  by Jane Austen Ashton Dennis and more besides.  

 

As I said earlier over the course of my research I claim to have discovered the most extraordinary, the most brilliantly hidden number and anagram puzzles.    HUNDREDS of them!  Some of just spellbinding genius.  Prior to 2018 only 1 pun was known to exist in Jane Austen's work.  I have found another half a dozen.  As puns not great puns perhaps,  but as hidden gems waiting to be found, they are constructions  of simply the most sublime artistry.   I know of nothing quite like these Easter Eggs in all literature.  If there had been anything quite like this they would have been found and worked out long ago. I cannot express my admiration for such brilliance adequately but be assured I admire them very much.  Finally there are schools of thought that believe coded messages may lie within her works.  I entirely agree.  There maybe more than 1 type of coded message.  I believe I know where they maybe hidden but regrettably I am not smart enough to work them out. 

 

 Before explaining in greater detail about the real life individual who may have inspired Mr.  Darcy  and everything else that I claim  from the dozens and dozens  of number and anagram puzzles available I give below  a small number of  quotes  from Jane Austen to show for the doubting that there is substance  to my claims.  In each quote is at least one   number and  or anagram puzzle for you to work out for yourself.  Those that understand  enjoy trying to solve  cryptic crossword puzzle have a definite advantage. 

                                               

                                A FEW  NUMBER AND ANAGRAM P U Z Z L E S  

1)  She danced four dances with him at Meryton; she saw him one morning at his own house, and has since dined with him in company four times.  This is not quite enough to make her understand his character."

"Not as you represent it.  Had she merely DINED with him, she might only have discovered whether he had a good appetite; but you must remember that four evenings have also been spent together--and four evenings may do a great deal."

"Yes; these four evenings have enabled them to ascertain that they both like Vingt - un better than Commerce;

2)  "Well then, Lady Bertram, suppose you speak for tea directly, suppose you hurry Baddeley a little, he seems behind hand to-night.

 

3)  Fanny could hardly have kept her seat any longer, or have refrained from at least trying to get away in spite of all the too public opposition she foresaw to it, had it not been for the sound of approaching relief, the very sound which she had been long watching for, and long thinking strangely delayed.

‘The solemn procession, headed by Baddeley, of tea-board, urn, and cake-bearers, made its appearance, and delivered her from a grievous imprisonment of body and mind.’

4)  "I wish you could see Compton," said he; "it is the most complete thing! I never saw a place so altered in my life. I told Smith I did not know where I was.  The approach now is one of the finest things in the country: you see the house in the most surprising manner.  I declare, when I got back to Sotherton yesterday, it looked like a prison--quite a dismal old prison."

"Oh, for shame!" cried Mrs. Norris.  "A prison indeed? Sotherton Court is the noblest old place in the world.")

  5)  The hair was curled, and the maid sent away, and Emma sat down to think and be miserable.- It was a wretched business indeed! -  Such an overthrow of every thing she had been wishing for!  -  Such a development of every thing most unwelcome! -  Such a blow for Harriet! - that was the worst of all.  Every part of it brought pain and humiliation, of some sort or other; but, compared with the evil to Harriet, all was light; and she would gladly have submitted to feel yet more mistaken- more in error - more disgraced by mis-judgment, than she actually was, could the effects of her blunders have been confined to herself.

 6) The Portsmouth girls turn up their noses at anybody who has not a commission.  One might as well be nothing as a midshipman.  One is nothing, indeed.  You remember the Gregorys; they are grown up amazing fine girls, but they will hardly speak to me, because Lucy is courted by a lieutenant."

7)"Do you know anything of my cousin's captain?" said Edmund;  "Captain Marshall?  You have a large acquaintance in the navy, I conclude?"

"Among admirals, large enough; but," with an air of grandeur, "we know very little of the inferior ranks. Post-captains may be very good sort of men, but they do not belong to us.  Of various admirals I could tell you a great deal: of them and their flags, and the gradation of their pay, and their bickerings and jealousies. But, in general, I can assure you that they are all passed over, and all very ill used.   Certainly, my home at my uncle's brought me acquainted with a circle of admirals. 

8)  "There will be but one subject throughout the parishes of Donwell. "

9)It was the gift of her good godmother, old Mrs. Admiral Maxwell, only six weeks before she was taken for death. Poor little sweet creature!  Well, she was taken away from evil to come. 

10)   Their affectionate mother shared all their grief; she remembered what she had herself endured on a similar occasion, five-and twenty years ago.   "I am sure" said she.  "I cried for two days altogether when Colonel Millar's regiment went away.  I thought I should have broken my heart."  

11)  Consider carefully the name Fairfax for  anagram/s relevant to Jane Fairfax .

12)  "The Miss Owens--you liked them, did not you?"

"Yes, very well. Pleasant, good-humoured, unaffected girls. But I am spoilt, Fanny, for common female society. Good-humoured, unaffected girls will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women.

13)   Ah! here's Miss Woodhouse. -  Dear Miss Woodhouse, how do you do? -  Very well I thank you, quite well.  This is meeting quite in fairy - land! -  Such a transformation! -  Must not compliment,  I know (eyeing Emma most complacently) - that would be rude - but upon my word, Miss Woodhouse, you do look - how do you like Jane's hair? -You are a judge. -  She did it all herself.  Quite wonderful how she does her hair! -  No hairdresser from London I think could. -  Ah! Dr. Hughes I declare - and Mrs. Hughes.  Must go and speak to Dr. and Mrs. Hughes for a moment. -  How do you do? How do you do? -  Very well, I thank you.  This is delightful, is not it? -  Where's dear Mr. Richard? -  Oh! there he is.  Don't disturb him.  Much better employed talking to the young ladies.  How do you do, Mr. Richard? -  I saw you the other day as you rode through the town -  Mrs. Otway, I protest! - and good Mr. Otway, and Miss Otway and Miss Caroline.  -Such a host of friends! - and Mr. George and Mr. Arthur! - How do you do?  How do you all do?

14)  This topic was discussed very happily, and others succeeded of similar moment, and passed away with similar harmony; but the evening did not close without a little return of agitation. The gruel came and supplied a great deal to be said--much praise and many comments -  undoubting decision of its wholesomeness for every constitution, and pretty severe Philippics upon the many houses where it was never met with tolerable; - but, unfortunately, among the failures which the daughter had to instance, the most recent, and therefore most prominent, was in her own cook at South End, a young woman hired for the time, who never had been able to understand what she meant by a basin of nice smooth gruel, thin, but not too thin.

15)  "How uncomfortable it is," whispered Catherine, "not to have a single acquaintance here!" 

16)   "On his return from Woodston two days before"

17)  This ill-timed intruder was Miss Tilney's maid, sent by her mistress to be of use to Miss Morland; and though Catherine immediately dismissed  her it recalled her to the sense of what she ought to be doing, and forced her in     spite of her anxious desire to penetrate this mystery, to proceed in her  dressing without further delay. Her progress was not quick, for her thoughts and her eyes were still bent on the object so well calculated to interest and alarm; and though she dared not waste a moment upon a second attempt, she could not remain  many paces from the chest.

18)  "There is no danger of Wickham's marrying Mary King"

19)   "I was in company with a certain Admiral Baldwin, the most deplorable-looking person you can imagine. His face like mahogany, all lines and wrinkles, nine grey hairs and only a dab of powder on top."

20)  "Miss Tilney gently hinted her fear of being late"    

21)  "Very likely,"  said Emma- "nothing more likely .  I know no man more likely than Mr.  Knightley  

Further reading  There is so, so much more; this is just the start 

Write down ALL the numbers In the 4 short chapters of The Watsons.  Do you notice anything?

Write down ALL the numbers in the unfinished Sanditon.  Do you notice anything?

Write down ALL the numbers and study the ALL  names  in the first 6 chapters of Northanger Abbey.  Do you notice anything ?

Write down all the numbers in the first 4 chapters of Mansfield Park.  Do you notice anything?

 

Within JA's work you will see use of the word  EIGHTH.  Often she will use the actual word EIGHTH.  Sometimes though this word has to  be "seen" as in Henry V111, or half a quarter of a mile, or furlong, (an eighth of a mile in each case ) or the word HEIGHT an anagram of Eighth.  But in Northanger Abbey it is hidden in my opinion at least with a brilliance I cannot express.  Can you find any???

Wherever there is a name in Jane Austen's work there is the possibility at least of an anagram puzzle.  

Look again at Fordyce and Fordyce's Sermons Pride and Prejudice 

Look in Emma at paragraphs containing the name Mr. Knightley for example in these few chapters.  

Chapter 5 paragraphs 3 and 4.   Chapter 18  paragraph 32.  Chapter 26..

There are many many more!

I hope you enjoy them.  They were created for you to enjoy.

Editor's Notes

Thank you for visiting my website.

A few notes of explanation:

                                                                          Jane Austen 

                                                              Some secrets revealed to include 

                                                             “Is this man the real Mr. Darcy of

                                                                        Pride and Prejudice" 

                                                                               

                                                                                by Nigel King 

Copyright Nigel King 2018-2021                                                                                                           

Author’s Note                                                                                                                                     

Easter Egg definitions

1) An artificial chocolate or hard boiled decorated egg given at Easter   

                                                                                             

2) An unexpected or undocumented feature in a piece of computer software or on a DVD included as a joke or bonus, ( this definition has come to include jokes etc in art for example the recently discovered initials LV and the date 1495 in the Mona Lisa  or the loaves in The Last Supper also by Leonardo Da Vinci, that a musician realised could also be musical notation for a 40 second requiem.       

 

 

                                                         Introduction

Jane Austen is thought by the literary world to be second only to the great William Shakespeare.  I think that position will change soon, as understanding of the fruits and results of my research become more widely known.  I fully expect that one day soon her works will be viewed as the very equal of Shakespeare but different.  Indeed there is a case for saying that in some ways she is perhaps the superior.   

 

I claim to have discovered the real life identity of the  man who inspired Mr.  Darcy,  of Pride and Prejudice fame, perhaps the most famous hero in literature. 

I claim to have discovered the real  life location of Thornton Lacey.  It is where the man I think was  Mr.  Darcy lived  on an estate initially rented in 1795 and purchased in 1799 for 42, 000 pounds. 

I claim to have discovered the real life location of Northanger Abbey.  It was owned by a cousin of the man I think was Mr.  Darcy.  A man who was a colonel just like  Darcy's cousin Colonel Fitzwilliam.

This man knew Hertfordshire a place Jane Austen never visited yet wrote about.  He owned an estate close to Ware the town thought by many to be the location of Meryton.

 

This man also knew some members of the Duke of Devonshire's family who owned Chatsworth House, often thought to be the inspiration for Pemberley.

 

He  knew Gracechurch Street very well, visiting it on several occasions in  the early 1790's where, as a set of accounts compiled by his friend show, he spent many hundreds of pounds at Number 2 Gracechurch Street Spinks and Co.

I also have explanations for the origins of the fictional names of Mansfield as in Mansfield Park ,Thornton Lacey, Northanger Abbey Pemberley (especially clever) the pseudonym used  by Jane Austen Ashton Dennis and more besides.  

 

Almost everything that Jane Austen tells us about Mr.  Darcy  apply to this man beginning with the fact that in 1795 when Jane Austen began Pride and Prejudice he was a young very rich single man.    

Whilst I cannot positively state examples of one degree of separation between Jane Austen herself and the man I think was Mr.  Darcy,  there are  some examples of one degree of separation between this man and  close members of Jane Austen's  immediate  family.  That does not mean they do not exist.  It is for example quite possible that Jane Austen knew this man's only sibling! a sister! worth  30,000!  married as she was to a Senior Prebendary at Winchester Cathedral.    

 

Over the course of my research I claim to have discovered the most extraordinary, the most brilliantly hidden number and anagram puzzles.    HUNDREDS of them!  Some of simply spellbinding genius.  That is not all though.  Prior to 2018 only 1 pun was known to exist in Jane Austen's work.  I have found another half a dozen.  As puns not great puns perhaps,  but as hidden gems waiting to be found, they are constructions  of simply the most sublime artistry.   I know of nothing quite like these Easter Eggs in all literature.  I cannot express my admiration for such brilliance adequately but be assured I admire them very much.  Finally there are schools of thought that believe coded messages may lie within her works.  I entirely agree.  I believe I know where they maybe hidden but regrettably I am not smart enough to work them out. 

 

 Before explaining in greater detail about the real life individual who may have inspired Mr.  Darcy  I give below  a small number of  quotes  from Jane Austen.  In each quote is at least one   number or anagram puzzle for you to work out for yourself. 

                                                                                                               

                                                 T H E   P U Z Z L E S  A N D  A N A G R A M S

1)  She danced four dances with him at Meryton; she saw him one morning at his own house, and has since dined with him in company four times. This is not quite enough to make her understand his character."

"Not as you represent it. Had she merely DINED with him, she might only have discovered whether he had a good appetite; but you must remember that four evenings have also been spent together--and four evenings may do a great deal."

"Yes; these four evenings have enabled them to ascertain that they both like Vingt - un better than Commerce;

 

2)  "Well then, Lady Bertram, suppose you speak for tea directly, suppose you hurry Baddeley a little, he seems behind hand to-night.

 

3)  Fanny could hardly have kept her seat any longer, or have refrained from at least trying to get away in spite of all the too public opposition she foresaw to it, had it not been for the sound of approaching relief, the very sound which she had been long watching for, and long thinking strangely delayed.

‘The solemn procession, headed by Baddeley, of tea-board, urn, and cake-bearers, made its appearance, and delivered her from a grievous imprisonment of body and mind.’

4)  "I wish you could see Compton," said he; "it is the most complete thing! I never saw a place so altered in my life. I told Smith I did not know where I was. The approach now is one of the finest things in the country: you see the house in the most surprising manner. I declare, when I got back to Sotherton yesterday, it looked like a prison--quite a dismal old prison."

"Oh, for shame!" cried Mrs. Norris. "A prison indeed? Sotherton Court is the noblest old place in the world.")

  5)  The hair was curled, and the maid sent away, and Emma sat down to think and be miserable.- It was a wretched business indeed! - Such an overthrow of every thing she had been wishing for!  - Such a development of every thing most unwelcome! - Such a blow for Harriet! - that was the worst of all. Every part of it brought pain and humiliation, of some sort or other; but, compared with the evil to Harriet, all was light; and she would gladly have submitted to feel yet more mistaken- more in error - more disgraced by mis-judgment, than she actually was, could the effects of her blunders have been confined to herself.

 6) The Portsmouth girls turn up their noses at anybody who has not a commission. One might as well be nothing as a midshipman. One is nothing, indeed. You remember the Gregorys; they are grown up amazing fine girls, but they will hardly speak to me, because Lucy is courted by a lieutenant."

7)"Do you know anything of my cousin's captain?" said Edmund; "Captain Marshall? You have a large acquaintance in the navy, I conclude?"

"Among admirals, large enough; but," with an air of grandeur, "we know very little of the inferior ranks. Post-captains may be very good sort of men, but they do not belong to us. Of various admirals I could tell you a great deal: of them and their flags, and the gradation of their pay, and their bickerings and jealousies. But, in general, I can assure you that they are all passed over, and all very ill used. Certainly, my home at my uncle's brought me acquainted with a circle of admirals. 

8)  "There will be but one subject throughout the parishes of Donwell. "

9)It was the gift of her good godmother, old Mrs. Admiral Maxwell, only six weeks before she was taken for death. Poor little sweet creature! Well, she was taken away from evil to come. 

10)   Their affectionate mother shared all their grief; she remembered what she had herself endured on a similar occasion, five-and twenty years ago.  "I am sure" said she. "I cried for two days altogether when Colonel Millar's regiment went away.  I thought I should have broken my heart."  

11)  Consider carefully the name Fairfax for  anagram/s to Jane fairfax .

12)  "The Miss Owens--you liked them, did not you?"

"Yes, very well. Pleasant, good-humoured, unaffected girls. But I am spoilt, Fanny, for common female society. Good-humoured, unaffected girls will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women.

 

13)   Ah! here's Miss Woodhouse.--Dear Miss Woodhouse, how do you do?--Very well I thank you, quite well. This is meeting quite in fairy-land!--Such a transformation!--Must not compliment, I know (eyeing Emma most complacently)--that would be rude--but upon my word, Miss Woodhouse, you do look--how do you like Jane's hair?--You are a judge.--She did it all herself. Quite wonderful how she does her hair!--No hairdresser from London I think could.--Ah! Dr. Hughes I declare--and Mrs. Hughes. Must go and speak to Dr. and Mrs. Hughes for a moment.--How do you do? How do you do?--Very well, I thank you. This is delightful, is not it?--Where's dear Mr. Richard?--Oh! there he is. Don't disturb him. Much better employed talking to the young ladies. How do you do, Mr. Richard?--I saw you the other day as you rode through the town--Mrs. Otway, I protest!--and good Mr. Otway, and Miss Otway and Miss Caroline.--Such a host of friends!--and Mr. George and Mr. Arthur!--How do you do? How do you all do?

14)  This topic was discussed very happily, and others succeeded of similar moment, and passed away with similar harmony; but the evening did not close without a little return of agitation. The gruel came and supplied a great deal to be said--much praise and many comments-- undoubting decision of its wholesomeness for every constitution, and pretty severe Philippics upon the many houses where it was never met with tolerable;--but, unfortunately, among the failures which the daughter had to instance, the most recent, and therefore most prominent, was in her own cook at South End, a young woman hired for the time, who never had been able to understand what she meant by a basin of nice smooth gruel, thin, but not too thin.

15)  "How uncomfortable it is," whispered Catherine, "not to have a single acquaintance here!" 

16)   "On his return from Woodston two days before"

 

 

17)  This ill-timed intruder was Miss Tilney's maid, sent by her mistress to be of use to Miss Morland; and though Catherine immediately dismissed  her it recalled her to the sense of what she ought to be doing, and forced her in     spite of her anxious desire to penetrate this mystery, to proceed in her  dressing without further delay. Her progress was not quick, for her thoughts and her eyes were still bent on the object so well calculated to interest and alarm; and though she dared not waste a moment upon a second attempt, she could not remain  many paces from the chest.

18)  "To be thrown  into company with Captain Wentworth"

19)   "I was in company with a certain Admiral Baldwin, the most deplorable-looking person you can imagine. His face like mahogany, all lines and wrinkles, nine grey hairs and only a dab of powder on top."

20)  "Very likely,"  said Emma- "nothing more likely .  I know no man more likely than Mr.Pemberley  

 

 

A Rather Different Puzzle.  I say that Pemberley is a complex riddle 

Its like a journey from A to B and returning  by a different route  

The first step on the way to B is making the rhyme with Pemberley

The rhyme is  "Remember Me"

Good luck with puzzling it out.

Further reading  There is so, so much more; this is just the start 

Write down ALL the numbers In the 4 short chapters of The Watsons.  Do you notice anything

Write down ALL the numbers in the unfinished Sanditon.  Do you notice anything

Write down ALL the numbers and study the ALL  names  in the first 5 chapters.  Do you notice anything 

Within JA's work you will see use of the word EIGHTH.  Sometimes though this word has to  be "seen" as in Henry V111, or half a quarter of a mile, or furlong, (an eighth of a mile) or the word HEIGHT an anagram of Eighth.  But in Northanger Abbey it is hidden in my opinion at least with a brilliance I cannot express.  Can you find any???

Wherever there is a name in Jane Austen's work there is the possibility at least of an angram puzzle.  

Fordyce's Sermons Pride and Prejudice 

Look in Emma at paragraphs containing the name Mr. Knightley for example in these few chapters.  

Chapter 5 paragraph 3 and 4.   Chapter 18  paragraph 32.  Chapter 26..

     Little did I realise when I first began this with a hunch, just how far this would go. It has been written down pretty much as it was realised. One piece at a time.  Rather like a detective trying to solve a crime, matching pieces of a jig-saw together, a little bit here, and a little bit there and then some more from elsewhere. Along the way mistakes and erroneous guesswork  makes their appearances.  The understanding of how things happened is random and does not appear in a neat, logical, sequenced order and therefore this piece does not appear in such order. But I never would have thought, never would have guessed, or imagined in my wildest imaginings that answers to questions and mysteries  that have puzzled scholars and academics around the world for over a century would be answered. The identity of Mr. Darcy, the locations of Northanger Abbey, Thornton Lacey, the reason Jane Austen may have written the phrase in a letter "sans peur et sans Reproche" why Jane Austen used the pseudonym Mrs. Ashton Dennis to name a few things and as if that were not already feast enough, that not one but several  secret hoards of "Easter Eggs" based around surnames in the form of anagram puzzles would appear 200 years after their creation by one of the world's greatest if not the greatest female novelist. Even If you know the formulas to find them they are still not always easy to figure out. And then there was more.

     Prior to 2018 only 1 pun (see rears and vices Mansfield Park) was known in Jane Austen's work. I have found 6 more cleverly concealed in plain view. Very recently (26 June 2020) I discovered 7 anagram puzzles  using the name Catherine on one page and later 3 in one paragraph in Northanger Abbey not to mention several more based upon the name Catherine.  Absolutely extraordinary.  For those who like the challenge most of them are to be found  somewhere between Chapter 11 and Chapter 17 in Northanger Abbey,

      Below to illustrate my points  although by themselves not enough perhaps to prove  what I say are 3 simple enough  anagram puzzles to solve once one understands the possibility that  they are there.  But first one needs to take on board the concept of finding the anagram puzzle by deleting and or exchanging letters. 

    2  are based around the character name of Baddeley.  This particular name is used according to the Jane Austen Thesaurus on 5 occasions.  In the 2 examples below the  name Baddeley is used once in each example.  The other 3 times in which Jane Austen  used this character name I found no anagram puzzle.       

        Quote Number 1

    "Well then, Lady Bertram, suppose you speak for tea directly, suppose you hurry BADDELEY a little, he seems behind hand tonight"

      An anagram of Baddeley if the letter B is deleted is Delayed and surely the context in the above quote is delay?

      By all means question whether I am right  as to whether this is indeed an anagram puzzle inserted by Jane Austen for readers to find.  I hope you do and this is why I have included this further use of of the name Baddeley

       

       "the very sound which she had been long watching for, and long thinking strangely DELAYED."

          The solemn procession headed by BADDELEY !!!!!!!"

         

      Hundreds of other puzzles based around names similar in character to  this are to be found.  Some worse, some better, some of quite extraordinary complexity, some have puns within them  and then there are some  whose only explanation is "the Real Mr. Darcy."  

    Here is a third example which I will leave for you to work out for yourselves.   It's a little less straightforward  to work it all out but rewarding when you do.   

"You remember the Gregory's;  they are grown up amazing fine girls, but they will hardly speak to me, because Lucy is courted by a lieutenant ."

      I add  these paragraphs 18 July 2020.   As if things were not astounding enough things have very recently just become even more extraordinary.  So to say the least I have now found that there are  also a number of "Easter Eggs " based around numbers.  I give one of them below as an example and request that you  consider whether I might be right or not.   The final quote  comes from Pride and Prejudice.  This is a simple enough "Easter Egg"to spot once you  appreciate  the need to  hunt for something hidden and special.   The relevant text is below and for the few who cant figure it out (surely not many?) A more detailed explanation will follow. 

     

" She  (Jane) has known him ( Bingley) only a fortnight.  She danced four dances with him at Meryton ; she saw him one morning at his house, and has since dined  in company with him four  times.  This is not quite enough to make her understand his character "

    "Not as you represent it.  Had she merely dined with him , she might  only have discovered whether he had a good appetite;  but you must remember that four  evenings have been also spent together - and four  evenings may do a great deal."

   " Yes; these four evenings have enabled them to know that they both like  Vingt - un  better than commerce. "

And then there is so much more.

I am not a writer by trade. There are  limitations.    So no judgements about  writing capabilities its about what I have found. Please remember that. 

SO TO BEGIN !     

Who was the real life "Mr. Darcy" of  the novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen? Or rather perhaps who was the original Mr. Darcy in First Impressions as Pride and Prejudice was originally titled. So far as I am aware nobody knows. Was there ever an original Mr. Darcy. There are many who believe that there may have been an original person who provided Jane Austen with the inspiration at least, for the character Mr. Darcy. 

      Names have been tendered. Books have been written proposing various characters as the original for Mr. Darcy.  There are bound to be suggestions as to who such a famous well drawn character might have been, based upon the fact that so many think there was an original Mr. Darcy.  But nobody really knows.  Could he have been a complete figment of Jane Austen's imagination, or a composite of the many people she knew or was there a real life individual who provided her with the inspiration. 

     

     Before discovering and publishing online my very recently uncovered findings I would have personally thought that there was a real life character who provided many of the "factual" details of appearance and position in society. The opening line sounds like it could be real dialogue borrowed from life. The ball sounds like the description of a real ball.  Darcy, arrogantly walking around sounds like the actions of a real individual.  The marriage proposal and refusal to and by Lizzie certainly feels as if there could be a basis in reality.  Even when Lizzie and Darcy meet again by chance has the feel of some basis in reality too and so on.  But perhaps nothing as regards plot, character, actions, and behaviour.  It would be no real surprise if an author borrowed from real life. To some extent all authors use something from real life. 

      But in the last few weeks of February 2018, I may have found a candidate for Mr. Darcy not so far considered. In my opinion he is far a  superior  candidate than others so far suggested.  Almost everything that Jane Austen tells us about Darcy, the snippets of detail for example a sister, an only sibling,  worth 30,000 pounds just like Darcy  this man seems to possess to an uncanny degree.    

      I discovered his existence whilst researching the author of the manuscript that my blog Wisden's Secret is primarily about Francis Emilius Cary Elwes, the man who I believe on the content of the ms. I am blogging about was in part at least the creator of Wisden's Almanack. (See foot of page)* 

      I looked for details about his family and friends and when I initially came across this gentleman candidate, who was Francis Emilius Cary Elwes's father I thought or rather a little voice inside me said "he could be Mr. Darcy." His main assets in this regard as far as I could see at the time were  that he was very rich and had been from a young age. 

   

      I thought no more about this until a few days ago (February 2018) when thinking what to put in something I at the time but since changed termed an Interlude.  So out of curiosity and just to make sure I looked his name up to see what could be found out about him and whether there was any possibility that he could be the original Mr. Darcy. There are three things that need to be ascertained and can be checked quickly for there to be the remotest chance of him being Mr. Darcy.  

      They are: - Was he rich ? - Was he young? - Was he single?  when Jane Austen began First Impressions. 

I already knew from earlier research into his son Francis that he might be rich but I quickly found out that his father died when he was young, aged about 10 and left him a huge amount quite possibly £10,000 a year or more which he most probably inherited at his coming of age 21. He was young too, in 1795/96 he was 23/24 and he was single. 

     A promising start. What else might be needed for there to be any hope of him being the original Mr. Darcy. Jane Austen gives several clues about him. For example.  He was an only son, as described earlier he had a sister, a sister worth £30,000, he was not a nobleman but a plain Mr.  He had it in his power to gift a church living, he owned a huge estate up north and he was clever. All of these things, and more this man I have found had in common with Mr. Darcy.  Aside from this though, the man I have found provides many other links to the book. Particularly Ware, or Meryton as she named it, is based as many think upon the town of Ware, a town that Jane Austen appears to know very well despite never having been there.  Ware however is a town where this man and his only sibling, a sister, must have known well because that is a town close to where they grew up.   The town of Ware was about 13 miles away from one of the estates their father owned. 

     

      To be considered also is what Jane Austen does not tell us about Darcy that is also true for Elwes. She does not say he served in the army or a militia or navy or was a solicitor or any of the other occupations a man like Darcy might have spent time engaged in particularly with the Napoleonic War in progress. Darcy is a gentleman, nothing more, nothing less, who lives life entirely as a gentleman with no financial pressures or any other pressures to do anything other than live life entirely as he pleased.  Elwes is exactly the same. 

      But I asked myself could Jane Austen have met this man? It is certainly not impossible but Yes!  I found that she could have met him but even if she did not actually meet him it is highly likely that she may have heard of him and that there were occasions when he could have been very close to Jane Austen and talking to people she knew in Winchester. She could also however have known of him for several years from another source much closer to home. 

      The more I looked the closer he came. So let’s start with the name Darcy.  Where did Jane Austen find that name?  A figment of her imagination perhaps? If so why Darcy, why not Smith or Jones or any other of the tens of thousands of names that exist?  Authors in general take a lot of care over characters names especially central characters. 

      Surely an unusual name like Fitzwilliam Darcy does not arrive unbidden and without some careful thought. Maybe the name did spring  carelessly from her imagination.  "Oh, Fitzwilliam Darcy.  That's a nice name " But I dont think so.  For an author as clever as Jane Austen one  would expect something a little better.   

  But  if you have this man’s name it becomes simplicity to suggest a possibility based around a word play as to where and how the name Darcy originated. Jane Austen enjoyed word games. The British library owns a set of ivory letters that used to belong to Jane Austen and with which word games could obviously be played. I have never heard the suggestion below as being the origin as to where the name Darcy may have sprung. So this is a first timer. (Due to one persons misunderstanding I must add that when I ask where did Jane Austen find that name I am not posing a question as to its historical, geographical, linguistic or etymological etc origins interesting as they maybe, but its artistic and imaginative origins.) 

 

     Suppose for argument's sake that Jane Austen knew a man whose real name she wanted to disguise. How might she do it. Here is one way.  Suppose this man's surname to be  Cray. What might she do to disguise it. Well she could try and Gallicize  it like this Richard Le Cray, Le Cary, Le Racy, or L'Arcy. Doesn't work. What about using De. Here we get Richard De Cray, De Cary, De Racy, or D'Arcy.  Add some magic, abracadabra,and eliminate the apostrophe and thus, could the name of Darcy have been created with this simple name game. 

      Or maybe in just playing with letters and adding a D to the Cray and looking for a name anagram the name Darcy appeared. This would be a simple way of disguising his identity. A name game which is of a type Jane Austen with her enjoyment of word games might well have liked. (See Emma /Dixon) 

      Either way her original audience of family members would have easily recognised him if there was indeed a "Mr. Darcy" and because mimicry is funny would have enjoyed her portrayal read aloud? of such a man. 

      Could this man have had his name disguised in such a way?  Yes he could if he had the right name to start with and this man, lo and behold did. For his name was Robert CARY Elwes and in 1795 when Jane Austen began First Impressions later to become Pride and Prejudice he was a very rich, young man with no wife.  Is Cary to Darcy and Darcy to Cary the first Easter Egg that I have found.  I think he is. 

      I have checked this man's name on the births, deaths, marriages and elsewhere etc. to find out about him and to see if he provides other links to Pride and Prejudice.  He most surely does. The first link that I found came from his early life and the obvious closeness of his connections to Hertfordshire that are to be found.  There is no proof only conjecture as to how Jane Austen appears to be so well informed about Hertfordshire (some cousins many times removed is the official, unproven!, best guess! version and regaled as the absolute unquestionable truth  that that is how she must have known details of Hertfordshire despite never having been there.  I am paraphrasing a little but this is pretty much the story that Maureen Stiller, (JAS) Deidre Le Fay (Expert) and few others have presented to me.  But if she did meet Robert Cary Elwes he would be an undeniably good source for knowledge of  life in Hertfordshire near the town of Ware given that one of his  estates was just  a few miles north of Ware.   

      He was born on the 28th of July 1772.  He may well have been born in a small village called Throcking.  The small village of Throcking is less than 15 miles away from both Hertford and Ware in the county of Hertfordshire. The village of Throcking looks now as it probably was then a very rural small village with very few buildings in it apart from the manor since demolished, a large, now converted barn, a parsonage and church. How promisingly auspicious. If there is one county where I would hope to find him Robert Cary Elwes it would be Hertfordshire and if there is one town I would wish to find him anywhere near it would be the towns of either Hertford and Ware, particularly Ware, the generally accepted most likely location for the fictional Meryton.  He certainly lived for a time at Throcking because his parents owned Throcking Manor.  His parents were Cary Elwes also born in Throcking and Elizabeth Elwes born Holgate.  Throcking Hall was a magnificent mansion built circa 1743 that reputedly cost £11,000 but was later demolished. Cary Elwes, his father died in 1782 leaving most of his estate  to Robert but also a substantial amount 30,000 pounds to Elizabeth his sister who if Robert died before the age of 21 would have inherited the lot. 

 

   In common with Darcy he has only one sister.  His sister Elizabeth was born 1771 and married Rev. Robert Cary Barnard (see Burke's Genealogical.... )  Other relatives with the name  Barnard will be met with a little later.  

     Elizabeth his sister is of course older than Darcy's sister Georgiana but obviously Georgiana's role could not have worked as it did if she was older. However Elizabeth his sister like Georgiana was also worth £30,000. Her father had left her £20,000 upon reaching the age of 21 and a further £10,000 was to come to her the day she married. 

Return to Northanger Abbey

Before returning to anagrams I must make one further point about the possibility that Torre Abbey is to some extent the  basis for Northanger Abbey.  Firstly this book was finished circa 1804.  Secondly during Catherine's guided tour around the abbey General Tilney names a few of the distinguished characters who have stayed there.  Two gentleman who stayed there of particular note are John Jervis Earl St. Vincent  who stayed for 9 months and who I earlier suggested could have influenced the portrayal of the character General Tilney.  The second very distinguished person to stay there, and quite probably the most famous Englishman at that time was Admiral Horatio Nelson who stayed for 1 night in 1801  and albeit a few years later in 1807 Caroline  Princess of Wales.   

N.b.  This section was originally typed in late July August 2020.  I thought it was published.  Exactly how it came to be unpublished I do not know.  It is probably something as simple  as I forgot to click publish before closing down the computer.  So here below are the anagram puzzles I found relating to Northanger Abbey  and if I might say so "What an extraordinary collection and quantity  they comprise in and of themselves let alone the fact that they are simply part of a far greater and more wondrous whole.  Fifty using just 1 name 8 on 1 page 4 in 1 paragraph.  Stunning !  I have not the words to praise highly enough.

Catherine   Chapter 1  Paragraph 1.    The puzzles begin from the off.  

In each case the relevant piece of text will be below with the relevant  word/words will be in italics  

"No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her to be born an heroine "

Not only can Catherine be made by exchanging the O in To and the O in Heroine for a C and A but also:

Exchange the N from An for a C and the O from Heroine  for a T to make Catherine 

Morland  Chapter 1  paragraph 2  The text Below

"Such was Catherine Morland at ten.  At fifteen appearances were mending, she began to curl her hair and long

Exchange the the N ang G of long for an M and R to make Morland.

Catherine  Chapter 1  Penultimate Paragraph.  This piece of text shows as clearly as one could wish that Jane Austen was well aware that "an heroine" was grammatically incorrect.  See also chapter 3 Tilney's opinion of women's deficiency in writing one of which is their "frequent ignorance of grammar"

"But when a young lady (Catherine) is to be a heroine. " 

As above exchanging the O in To and the O in Heroine for a C and A to make Catherine

Morland's   Chapter 2  Paragraph  1   N.B.  Another example of the use of an apostrophe s with a name to make an anagram puzzle.  

"In addition to what has already been said about Catherine Morlands's personal"

By exchanging the

P and E in Personal for an M and D to make Morlands.

Morland  Chapter 2  Paragraph  2

"But Mrs Morland knew so little of lords and baronets."

By deleting either the D or S and exchanging the other for an M the name Morland can be made

Sarah  Chapter 2  Paragraph  3    Noteworthy because its the first  example of 2/3 puzzles in one phrase with the same name 

"Sally, or rather Sarah, ( for what young lady of common gentility will reach the age of sixteen without altering her name as far as she can)"

Exchange the E of Her for an A to make Sarah and 

Exchange the F of Far for an H to make Sarah twice using As 

Catherine's  Chapter 2  Paragraph  3

"It is remarkable, however, that she neither insisted on Catherine's 

By exchanging one of the H's and one of the E's for a C and A to make Catherine's

Catherine  Chapter 2  Paragraph 9

"Catherine, however kept close at her side,"

By exchanging the S and D from Side for a C and N the name Catherine can be found 

Allen       Chapter 2  "  Paragraph  9   With shorter names like Allen there are many instances of being able to exchange and or delete utilizing 2 letters to make a relevant name anagram.  I only note and  include this one  although I think it quite possible in the great scheme of Jane Austen's work that ALL should be included.  I will include any short name that requires only 1 letter change (assuming I spot them) and 1 name where 2 changes are used 

"Mrs. Allen did all that she could" 

Delete either the S or H of She and exchange the other for an N to make Allen 

Catherine   Chapter  2  Paragraph  12   There are a choice selection of rather more subtly cryptic anagrams.  Usually it is required to delete and or exchange up to 2  letters from one or two words.  In this example it is still required to delete or exchange up to  2 letters but in this case it is from a sequence of letters that link  2 words.  I have italicized the relevant letters.  More remarkable still is that the name in this example using this methodology can be found more than once .  Furthermore, were that not already enough.  Note also the exclamation mark at the end of the quote.   I cant help myself but I have to ask "How clever is that?!" 

"How uncomfortable it is," whispered Catherine, "not to have a single acquaintance here!" 

1)  Take the letters I N T A N C E H E R 

By deleting one of the N's Catherine can be made

2)   Take the letters  I N T A N C E H E R E 

By deleting one of the N's and one of the E's Catherine can be made 

3)  Take the letters  T A N C E H E R E 

By exchanging one of the E's for an I the name Catherine can be made 

4)  Take the letters N T A N C E H E R 

By exchanging the an E for an I the name Catherine can be made.

5)   Take the letters  A I N T A N C E H E 

By deleting either the A or N and exchanging the other for an R  the name Catherine can be found.

I am of the opinion given Jane Austen's known liking  for anagrams,  for her ability to create meaning  that has to be seen by the reader  and what is to come in a similar vein  that all the above are meant to be found, by you, the reader, if you can.

Allen  Chapter 2  Paragraph  17

"But, dear Mrs. Allen, are you sure there is nobody you know in all this multitude of people?"

Very simple and obvious.  Exchange the I from In for an E to make the name Allen.

Catherine  Chapter 3  Paragraph  2

"to our heroine "  Our heroine in this instance being Catherine.   As before exchange the 2 o's for a C and A to make Catherine 

Tilney  Chapter 3  Paragraph  Sixth from the end

"Mr. Tilney was polite"

By exchanging the P and O of the word Polite for an N and Y the name Tilney can be made.

Chapter 4  Paragraph 2 is deserving of comment for the following quote 

"despair of nothing we would attain" as " unwearied diligence our point would gain"  

The notes in my copy of Northanger Abbey say that these lines are untraced.   Why might they not be an original rhyming couplet by Jane Austen?

Thorpe  Chapter 4  paragraph  2

"the stranger pronounced hers to be Thorpe" 

Exchanging the S of Hers for a P one can  make the name Thorpe

Isabella  Chapter 4  paragraph 3  This one is questionable But.....

"the tallest is Isabella"

By exchanging the 2 t's and an S for an A and B one can make the name Isabella.  The letters used in this exchange are BATTSIf one exchnges a T for an R one can make the word BRATS or if one deletes either the  T aor S and  exchanges the other for an H one can make the town Bath.  I include this with a big question mark.

Thorpe  Chapter4   Penultimate Paragraph 

" Mrs. Thorpe was a widow, and not a very rich one; she was a good humoured, well meaning woman, and a very indulgent mother." 

Exchange the M from Mother for a P to make the name Thorpe.

Catherine  Chapter 5  Paragraph  1

"Catherine was not so much engaged at the theatre that evening, in returning the nods and smiles"

Exchange one of the T's in Theatre for a C to make the name Catherine.

Catherine  Chapter 5  Paragraph 2

""Here Catherine and Isabella arm in arm,"

This is an anagram that can be done twice due to the double use of the word arm. 

By exchanging one of the R's and the M for a C and a T the name Catherine can be made  

Andrews  Chapter 6  Paragraph  12

"a Miss Andrews, a sweet girl, one of the sweetest in the world has read every one of them."

" possibilities in one short phrase.

By exchanging one of the A's and the H from has read for an N  and a W  or by exchanging the O and an E from read one for an S and W in each case the name Andrews can be made.

Isabella  Chapter 6  Paragraph  16

"Isabella laughed. It is very true, upon my honour,; but I see how it is: you are indifferent to everybody 's admiration except of one gentleman who shall be nameless."

Rather like the aforementioned acquaintance.  If you exchange the O in Who for an I then this letter together with the words shall be makes Isabella. 

Thorpe  Chapter 6  Final  Paragraph

"... of Miss Thorpe, and her resolution of humbling the sex, they set off immediately as fast as they could walk, in pursuit of the two young men. "

Exchange the W from the word two for a P and together with Her one can make the name Thorpe.

Isabella  Chapter7  Paragraph Sixth from end of chapter.

"She (Isabella) is a most amiable girl;"

Exchange one of the A' and the M for an S and an L to make Isabella

Morland Chapter  9  Paragraph  10

"I beg your pardon, for this liberty Miss Morland,"

Exchange the I of I and the P of Pardon for an M and L to make the name Morland 

Catherine  Chapter  9  Paragraph  11

"Catherine interested at once by her appearance..."

Exchange the O in Once for an I to make the name Catherine.

 

Catherine  Chapter 10  Paragraph  2

"No,"said Catherine  " He is not here

Exchange the I from Is and the O from Not for a C and an A to make Catherine

Catherine  Chapter 10  Paragraph  8

"... till Catherine began to dou8bt the happiness of a situation which confining her entirely to her friend and brother, gave her (Catherine) very little notice of either."

Exchange the O from Notice for an A to make Catherine

Henry  Chapter 10  Paragraph  10

"Henry!" she replied with a smile,  "Yes, he does dance very well"

Exchange one of the E's and the S for an R and an N to make the name Henry

Catherine  Chapter 10  Paragraph  24

"Catherine had neither..." 

Delete  one of the H's or the D and exchange the other for a C to make Catherine

Fletcher  Chapter 10  Paragraph 29..."Sam Fletcher , has got one to sell that would suit anybody. A famous clever animal for the road -..."

Delete either the V or an E and exchange the other for an F to make Fletcher.

Allen  Chapter 10  Paragraph  51  Some might object to this one but I would refer them to Acquaintance here and other anagram puzzles where sequential parts of words are utilized as will follow soon

"Only go and call on Mrs.Allen"

Whilst one can delete the C from Call and exchange the O from On for an E to make Allen,  however the deletion of the C is not needed if viewed as a sequence of letters connecting 2 words and I feel this needs to be pointed out

 

Catherine  Chapter 11  Paragraph  14

"The clock struck twelve, and it still rained- "You (Catherine ) will not be able to go my dear."

Exchange the D from Rained for a C to make Catherine

 

St. Aubin  Chapter  11  Paragraph  15    Aubin  as in St. Aubin should be spelt  with a Y and not an I.  Why, when Jane Austen  must have known it should be spelt with a Y did she spell it with an I. 

..."or at least in Tuscany, and the South of France! - the night that poor St. Aubin died !"

I propose that by spelling it correctly readers may have spotted the anagram more easily.  As it is when the B from Aubin is exchanged for a C you get the pun of Tuscani and if you go further and exchange the I for a Y do you get Tuscany  

Catherine  Chapter  11  Paragraph  17

"...And  Catherine had barely watched him down the street when her notice was claimed by the approach..."

A simple exchange easily seen exchange of the O in Notice for an A to make the name Catherine

Catherine  Chapter  11  Paragraph  22

*"Blaize Castle!" cried Catherine: "what is that"

A double puzzle By exchanging the D from Cried and either the W from What or the T from That for an N and an E to make Catherine twice 

Blaize Castle  Chapter  11

  There is no anagram to be found from Blaize Castle But I feel Blaize Castle  worth noting.  Jane Austen was clearly aware of Blaize Castle.  She was clearly aware to some extent of the most famous garden landscaper in England during the early years of the 19th century Humphrey Repton to the extent that she  knew how much he charged and references him in Mansfield Park .  He is especially well known for the production of his delightful "Red Books" which he created for every garden he did designs for.  One of these "Red Books" was for Blaize Castle.

 

Isabella  Chapter   11  Second from the End

Isabella is speaking  " I wonder whether it will be a full ball or not!"

Exchange one of the B's and the T for an S and an A to make Isabella

Catherine  Chapter  12  Paragraph  16

"Whilst talking to each other, she  (Catherine)  had observed with some surprise..."

Exchange one of the H's and the O from other for an I and an N to make Catherine

 

 Isabella  Chapter  13  Paragraph  1

"Do not urge me, Isabella. I am engaged to Miss Tilney. I cannot go." is availed nothing. The same arguments assailed her again;"

Exchange the D and an S from Assailed for a B and an L to make Isabella

Catherine  Chapter  13  Paragraph  2

"She knew her beloved Catherine to have so feeling a heart"

N.B.  Another sequence anagram 

Exchange the G and A for a C and  E to make Catherine 

Catherine  Chapter  13  Paragraph  3

"Catherine thought this reproach equally strange and unkind.  Was it the part of a friend thus to expose her feelings to the notice of others?"

Exchange one of T's and the O of Notice for an A and an r to make Catherine 

Isabella  Chapter  13  Paragraph  4

"...was a broken by Isabella; who in a voice of cold resentment said "Very well, then there is an end of the party."

Exchange the W from Well and the N from An for an A and B to make Isabella

Catherine  Chapter  13  Paragraph  6

"I (Catherine) dare say either of them would like to go."

Exchange the S and Y from Say for a C and N to make Catherine

Isabella  Chapter  !3 Paragraph  16

"Isabella's countenance was once more all smiles and, and good humour 

Exchange one of the L's and the M from Smiles for an A and B to make ISABELLA'S

Catherine  Chapter  13  Paragraph  22

"Then I will go after them" said Catherine

Exchange one of the T's and the F from After for a C and an I to make Catherine

Catherine  Chapter  13 Paragraph  32

"Dear madam,"  cried Catherine, "then why did you not tell me so before"

Exchange the D from Cried for an A to make Catherine 

Catherine  Chapter13  Final paragraph

""if she (Catherine ) had been guilty of one breach of propriety

Exchange the O from One and the B from Breach for an I and T to make Catherine.

Catherine  Chapter  14  Paragraph  1

"The Tilneys called for her at the appointed time;"

Exchange one of the T's and the M from time for a C and an N to make Catherine

Emily  Chapter14  Paragraph  11

"- I want an appropriate simile; - as far as your friend Emily herself left poor Vallencout"

From Simile minus the S to the punning anagram  Emili?

Catherine  Chapter 14  from Paragraph  12  Catherine says

" Not very good, I am afraid.  But now really, do not you think Udolpho THE NICEST book in the world." 

I have used capital letters for the phrase  said by Catherine "The nicest" because 

Firstly by exchanging one of the T's and the S from Nicest for an A and an R the name Catherine can be made and secondly because the first words in Henry Tilney's reply are "The nicest" and thirdly in the next paragraph where Miss tilney remonstrates with Henry for his impertinence we see this phrase "The word nicest"

In the following 3 paragraphs reproduced below the word NICE is used 6 times.  On 5 of those occasions an anagram involving the use of the word NICE can be made 

3 times the phrase "A VERY NICE "  By exchanging the V and Y of Very for a T and H will make the name Catherine

1 time the phrase "NICE IN THEIR"` From the words Nice and Their by exchanging the letter I for an A Catherine can be made. Not only this but also the sequence of letters CE IN THEIR  where again exchanging an I for an A the name Catherine can be made 

Finally in the next paragraph  "You ARE more NICE THAN  wise.   By deleting 1 of the N's and1 of the A's the name Catherine can be made.   

Not many novelists would consider  using the words  NICE and NICEST never mind using both in just 1 page collectively  10 times.

Not very good, I am afraid. But now really, do not you think Udolpho the nicest book in the world?"

"The nicest--by which I suppose you mean the neatest. That must depend upon the binding."

"Henry," said Miss Tilney, "you are very impertinent. Miss Morland, he is treating you exactly as he does his sister. He is forever finding fault with me, for some incorrectness of language, and now he is taking the same liberty with you. The word 'nicest,' as you used it, did not suit him; and you had better change it as soon as you can, or we shall be overpowered with Johnson and Blair all the rest of the way."

I am sure," cried Catherine, "I did not mean to say anything wrong; but it is a nice book, and why should not I call it so?"

"Very true," said Henry, "and this is a very nice day, and we are taking a very nice walk, and you are two very nice young ladies. Oh! It is a very nice word indeed! It does for everything. Originally perhaps it was applied only to express neatness, propriety, delicacy, or refinement--people were nice in their dress, in their sentiments, or their choice. But now every commendation on every subject is comprised in that one word."

"While, in fact," cried his sister, "it ought only to be applied to you, without any commendation at all. You are more nice than wise.

Isabella  Chapter 15  Paragraph  5

"Isabella now entered the room with so eager a step, and a look of such happy importance, as engaged all her (Catherine) friends notice." 

Exchange the H and R from Her for a B and I to make Isabella.

Catherine  Chapter 15  Paragraph  5.  Exactly the same text but this time the words in italics are her and notice

As in a previous example exchange the O from Notice for an A to make Catherine.

Catherine  Chapter  15  Paragraph  10

"You will be so much infinitely dearer to me, my Catherine, than either Anne or Maria" 

In this puzzle there are 2 anagrams to find . The first using "than either" the second "either Anne"

In the first delete either a T or H from Than or Either and exchange the other for a C to make Catherine 

In the second delete either an N or E from Either or Anne and exchange the other for a C to make Catherine.

 

Andrews  Chapter  15  Paragraph  14

"I remember too, Miss Andrews drank tea with us that evening,..." 

Exchange the K from Drank and the U from Us for an E and W to make Andrews.

Isabella  Chapter  16  Paragraph  1

"Isabella, on hearing the particulars of the visit, gave a different explanation. "It was all...." 

Exchange the T from It and the W from Was for a B and an E to make Isabella

Catherine  Chapter c 17  Paragraph  1

"...And her (Catherine) happiness being certain for that period,..."

Delete an R from either Her or Certain to make the name Catherine

Henry  Chapter 18  Paragraph  10  To all rules should be an exception?  Here is an exception to short names requiring a double change of letter

"...with Henry at her heart...."

At her is an anagram of Heart 

By exchanging the A and T for an N and Y the name Henry can be made twice 

What's in a name one might ask.  With Jane Austen everything.  None of these anagrams puzzles could exist if characters had different names.  Isabella for example is not interchangeable with Catherine.  The sense of the text might not alter but its fullest  meaning when understood is lost.   

Isabella  Chapter 18   Paragraph 2  When considering this anagram  puzzle remember St.  Aubin

"...a fine opportunity for being really so; and therefore gaily said,"Do not be uneasy Isabella..."

Exchange the R from really for a B and the O from So for an A and something approximating to Isabella can be made       YSABELLA 

Isabella  Chapter 18  Paragraph  19

Isabella is speaking and says " All that is best known to yourself" 

Delete one of the S's from either Is or Best and exchange the T from Best for an A to make Isabella

James  Chapter  19  Paragraph  1

",....and allowing him almost an equal share with James..."

By exchanging the T in the sequence of italicized kletters for a J the name James can be made.

Catherine  Chapter 19  Paragraph  1 

Immediately after in the above quote  "in her notice and smiles"

Catherine is observing the behaviour of Isabella and Captain Tilney.  A repeat of a previous puzzle by exchanging the O in Notice for an A the name Catherine can be found

Tilney  Chapter 19  4th paragraph  from end

Henry Tilney is speaking  

"...is only to be secured by her seeing nothing of Captain Tilney?  Is he safe only in solitude

Note a the repetition of "is only"  and note also "only to" "only in"  There are if two letters exchanged a number of wayys to make Tilney

Catherine  Chapter  19  3rd paragraph from the end 

"Their hearts are open to each other as neither heart can be to you (Catherine)"

Double anagram  

Firstly the words Neither and Can By deleting the N from Neither or Can to make the name Catherine

Secondly the words Heart Can Be.  By deleting either an A or the B and exchanging the other for for I to make Catherine

N.B The next word after "heart can be" is to spelt to and not two  Coincidence?

Eleanor  Chapter  20  Paragraph  9

"I am always sorry to leave Eleanor "

Exchange the T from To and the V from Leave for an N and R to make Eleanor

 Catherine  Chapter  21  Paragraph  3 

 

 A quite unprecedented  grouping of anagram puzzles.  Absolutely  outstanding in their constructive brilliance.  For those that really wish to write like Austen You have a long way to go before you get close to your goal  and you will not be churning your parodies  out annually or more frequently any longer!  

For the sake of clarity the relevant portions of text will be capitalised. 

 

This ill-timed intruder was Miss Tilney's maid, sent by her mistress to be of use to Miss Morland; and though Catherine immediately dismissed  H E R,  I T   R E C A  lled her to the sense of what she ought to be doing, and fo  R C E D  H E R,  I N   spite of her anxious desire to penetrate this mystery, to pro  C E E D  I N   H E R   dressing without further delay. Her progress was not quick, for her thoughts and her eyes were still bent on the object so well calculated to interest and alarm; and though she dared not waste a moment upon a second attempt, she could not remain  many paces from the chest.

Firstly      the sequence of letters  HERITRECA.  By exchanging an  R for an N Catherine can be made

Secondly    "           "         "      "        RCEDHERIN.   "          "              "   R and D for an A and T  Catherine can be made  

Thirdly       "           "         "       "       CEEDINHER.  "           "              "   E and   D for an A and T           "          "    "       "

 

I personally do not believe for a second that the fact that Catherine can be made in the above ways to be an accident.  Could there be more to be found from these 3 puzzles.  I would not be surprised if there were, but if there is it eludes me.

In the paragraph before  this passage we see Catherine studying the old wooden chest and the mysterious cypher on the lid, where the initial that  looks as if it should be a T is anything but.  If there is a code/s is the above somehow a key??? 

 

 The last anagram puzzle requires the deletion of the M from Remain and the S from Chest to make Catherine.

 

Tilney  Chapter 21  Paragraph  5

"Miss Tilney gently hinted her fear of being late"    

Exchange the G for an I to make Tinley

Catherine  Chapter  21  paragraph  10

"she (Catherine) took her candle and looked closely at the cabinet"

Delete either one T or the B and exchange the other for an R to make Catherine.

Catherine  Chapter  21 Penultimate  paragraph

"She seized, with an unsteady hand, the precious manuscript, for half a glance sufficed to ascertain written characters;

Exchange an A and the S for an H and an E to make Catherine.

Eleanor  Chapter  23  Paragraph  7

"She ventured , when next alone with Eleanor, to express her wish..."

Exchange the two O's for an E and an R to make the name Eleanor.

Catherine  Chapter  23  Paragraph  15

"I have many pamphlets to finish" said he to Catherine., "before I can close my eyes; and perhaps may be poring over the affairs of the nation for hours after you are asleep.  Can either of us be more usefully employed."

No deleting or exchanges of letters needed here for Catherine is an anagram of Can Either .

Eleanor  Chapter  24  Paragraph  14

"...and does Eleanor leave you to find your way...."

Exchange the V from Leave and the T from to for an N and R to make Eleanor

Catherine  Chapter  24  Paragraph  24

"Catherine said nothing. - After a short silence, during which he had closely observed her, he added, "As there is nothing ..."

Exchanging the S's for a C and an N the name Catherine can be made.

Eleanor  Chapter 24  Paragraph  24

"Eleanor, I suppose, has talked of her a great deal?"

Exchange the H and D for an N and O to make Eleanor.

Catherine  Chapter  25  The letter to Catherine

"Dearest Catherine, beware how you give your heart."  

Exchange the G and V in Give for a C and N to make Catherine.

Robinson  Chapter 26  5th Paragraph from the end.  Robinson is yet another character who says nothing, does nothing, quite superfluous to the situation into which he has been introduced.   Why is he there? 

This is a complicated convoluted anagram so all the pertinent letters for the sake of clarity are in capitals 

"-you approve it as AN OBject; - it is enough. Henry remember that Robinson IS spoken TO about it."

Exchange the A in An and the t in To for an R and an N to make Robinson.

Davis  Chapter  27  Letter to Catherine by Isabella

"...by the side of Charlotte Davis."

Delete either the O or From Of and exchange the other for a V

Catherine  Chapter  28  Paragraph  9

"At that moment Catherine thought she heard a step in the gallery,"

Delete either the H or D from Heard and exchange the other to make Catherine.

Catherine  Chapter 28  paragraph  13

"....to make Catherine's heart sink

Exchange the K from Sink for an E to make Catherine's.

Catherine  Chapter  28  paragraph  32

"Well I (Catherine) am certain of

3 possibilities 

By exchanging A and M of Am for an H and E  or Exchanging O and F from Of for an H ad E  to make in each case the name Catherine

Or  as part of a sequence of letters  by exchanging the M from Am and the O from Of for an H and E to make the name Catherine.

Eleanor  chapter  28  Paragraph  39  Catherine is speaking to Eleanor

"And if we are to part, a few hours sooner or later, you know, it, it makes no difference.  I can be ready by seven.  let me be called in time.  Eleanor saw that she wished to be alone."

Firstly by exchanging one of the R's and the T from Later for an E and an N to make Eleanor

Secondly  by exchanging the B from Be for an R to make Eleanor.

Henry  Chapter  29  Paragraph  3

"Henry could not have betrayed her.  If 

Remember St. Aubin/  Exchange the F from If for an N to make a word that sounds like Henry

 

Catherine  Chapter  29  Paragraph  7

"A heroine returning at the close of her (Catherine ) career" 

Exchange the O from Heroine for a C to make the name Catherine

Catherine  Chapter  30  Paragraph  1

"Catherine's disposition was not naturally sedentary, nor had her habits been ever very industrious; but whatever might hitherto have been her defects of that sort, her mother could not but perceive them now to be greatly increased. She could neither sit still nor employ herself for ten minutes together.

Exchange the I and T from neither or sit for an A and C to make Catherine's

Catherine  Chapter  30  Paragraph  8

"...set her (Catherine) heart at ease for a time,Exchange a T and the M from tin=me for a C and an N to make Catherine.

Catherine  Chapter  30  Paragraph  9

"She was assured of his affection; and that heart in return"

Another sequence of letters from which via one exchange makes a meaningful name.  In this case it is againe Catherine .  By exchanging one of the R's for a C the name Catherine can be made.

Catherine  Chapter  30  Paragraph  9 

 "...and dreadfully derogatory of an heroine's dignity."

Again the grammatically incorrect "An Heroine"  By exchanging an N and the O for a and T we can make  the Catherine's (dignity)

 

Woodston  Chapter  30  paragraph   10

"On his return from Woodston two days before,"

Delete the A or Y from Days and exchange the other for an O to make Woodston.

Catherine  Chapter  31  Paragraph  4

"...and Catherine and all who loved either,

Exchange the D from And for a C to make Catherine

I would hope that anyone who gets this far has long been able to see the possibility at least of some of the anagram puzzles as they read the quotes from the text rather than waiting for my explanation.  I am also sure (Do I know?) that I have not found all of them.    

Copyright Nigel  King with additions and amendments  August 2020 - October  2021 

Shortly after finding and writing about what I had found in relation to the Gardiners signatures in their letters  and the extraordinary anagrams that existed I decided to have another look at Panegyric and Ignorance.  I had noted that these 2 words could if 3 letters were exchanged make Catherine.  In the word  PANEGYRIC  the letters used in the exchange to create Catherine   were T H E P Y and G  and in IGNORANCE they were  T H E N O G.

       T H E P Y G  according to the Scrabble Word Finder does not produce many anagrams when 1 letter is exchanged. In fact there is only 1 and that word is EIGHTY. 

     There are a lot of anagrams puzzles in Northanger Abbey.  Could the number Eighty refer to the number of anagrams of Catherine for example there are very many of them or in total.   Or something else altogether.    One has to start somewhere and so back to page 1 chapter 1 of Northanger Abbey.

       It was at this point that I saw the aforementioned  grammatical error in the phrase  "to be an heroine" and from which the name Catherine can be found.  Close to conclusive proof that this was  not a mistake but deliberate came in the second paragraph from the end  where the text reads "But when a lady is TO BE A HEROINE" Almost the same phrase, bar one essential letter and grammatically correct. 

One should also look at what Henry Tilney has to say a few pages later about the ability of women to write letters.  He states that in particular their ability is faultless except in 3 particulars.  "A general deficiency of subject, a total inattention to stops and a very frequent ignorance of grammar."  It is intentional I believe and not for nothing that  Jane Austen has made that grammatical error. 

Pride and Prejudice 

At this point I could not resist having a quick look in P and P to see if there was anything remotely similar and easy to spot.  There is and how good is it.  I confess to being surprised that the has not been spotted. Below is the text from Chapter 6  Paragraph 7  The meaningful words are in Block capitals 

 

" She  (Jane) has known him ( Bingley) only a fortnight.  She danced FOUR dances with him at Meryton ; she saw him ONE morning at his house, and has since dined in company with him FOUR time.  This is not quite enough to make her understand his character "

    "Not as you represent it.  Had she merely dined with him , she might  only have discovered whether he had a good appetite;  but you must remember that FOUR evenings have been also spent together - and FOUR evenings may do a great deal."

   " Yes; these FOUR evenings....

 

What is special about the number 4 being used 5 times and the number 1 being  used once 

Very simple because 5 times 4  ( or 5 lots of 4 added together ) equals 20 and 20 plus  1 equals 21. Which is significant because the entire sentence reads 

 

"Yes; those FOUR evenings have enabled them to know that they both like VINGT - UN  (Twenty -one)  better than Commerce. 

 

It hardly seems credible that nobody has seen that,  but a quick internet search indicates not.

A few months later and I had another look at this piece of text and noticed something more.  The word dined is written in italics.   Using the anagram formula of deducting 2 letters I deduct 2 letters from the first word of that sentence ie the letters A and D to leave the H.   The letter H and the letters H D I N E D can be rearranged to make the anagram  H I D D E N.   Is that chance?  With just 1 example inconclusive.  But following in a few paragraphs is some evidence that I think shows beyond doubt that Jane Austen really  is a virtuoso performer who operates at a rarefied esoteric level way beyond the  most mere mortals.   

A fortuitous look again at Mansfield Park revealed another little Easter Egg within another Easter egg already described.  The relevant text is below

"Old Mrs. Admiral Maxwell, Only SIX weeks before she was taken for death.  Poor little sweet creature! Well, she was taken away from... "  There are 3 more words to end this quote.  Count the number of words from SIX.  There are 17 

 The rest of the quote beginning with the eighteenth word  (3 times 6)  is EVIL TO COME.    Who saw that coming!!!

 

 

What is special about  Ninety

The first thing to say about ninety is that according to the Jane Austen Thesaurus the word ninety is used only twice.  It maybe that it is used in Northanger Abbey but I have not found it.  But I do need to find ninety somewhere to fit the puzzle.  Which is why I made the point earlier about the possibility of making 90 by adding together two lots of  5 times 9 which equals 45  

However  that is not the only way to find  NINETY.  There is an anagram puzzle based around a name that enables NINETY to be found.  Using the Jane Austen Thesaurus as a guide it can be found  221 times.   Its simple enough to figure out  once one realises it exists.

 

 

Eighty

It must also be pointed out that in order to find Eighty there is another way besides 40 = 40 and that is if the letters used to make EIGHTH are used.  It is also possible to make the word Eighty instead by exchanging for a Y instead of an H.  But where is the word EIGHTH?   

 

 I have not finished searching yet but  some points  that I think must be  deliberate.

Every number between one and ten is used somewhere and some especially  one, two, and three many times

Every number between ten and twenty is  used at least once  as well (except nineteen as I found and explain later) 

Every multiple of ten is used if I include Eighty from Panegyric and ninety from the above explanation

Zero I believe to be represented by the words None or Nothing.

Halves and quarters are also to be found  but where are the eighths or threequarters.  I can find Nought Half  and Quarter  but to maintain a sequence I need either an Eighth or a Three - quarters.   Initially I could not find either  in Northanger Abbey

For my theory not to leak water I need to find at least one eighth or one threequarters somewhere.

Three quarters was to be found in Chapter 26  "Two hours and three-quarters will carry us to Woodston"

Eighths are to be found.  To find an eighth  it is necessary to return to Panegyric a word used twice in Northanger Abbey.  Back to the letters exchanged to make Catherine from Panegyric    T H E P Y G .   As pointed out earlier by exchanging the P for an I it is possible to make the word Eighty.  But further examination shows that by 

Exchanging the  P for an I and deleting an the Y makes EIGHT 

Exchanging the P for an I and the Y for an S then the word EIGHTS can be made and finally 

Exchanging the P for an I and the Y for an H the word E I G H T H  can be made thus filling the blank space in the sequence. .  Clever  But There is more 

Look at the letters used in the exchange of letters from Ignorance to make Catherine  T H E N O G  Similarly 

Exchanging the N for an I to make EIGHTY 

Exchanging the  N for an I and deleting the O to make EIGHT 

Exchanging the N for an I and the O for an S to make EIGHTS 

and finally 

Exchanging the N for an I and the O for an H to make E I G H T H

MMMMM

Look at the letters used in the exchange of letters from Ignorance to make Catherine  T H E N O G  Similarly 

Exchanging the N for an I to make EIGHTY 

Exchanging the  N for an I and deleting the O to make EIGHT 

Exchanging the N for an I and the O for an S to make EIGHTS 

and finally 

Exchanging the N for an I and the O for an H to make E I G H T H

 

But this is not the end

 

Twice the word panegyric is used and 6 times perhaps more (I have only counted 6)  the word ignorance is used. 

SIX  PLUS  TWO  EQUALS   EIGHT.  Or put another way perhaps 2 Eighths plus 6 eighths equals 1 (This must be checked for complete accuracy) 

Is that? or is that not?     

                                                                J U S T  D I V I N E

A riddle inside a mystery wrapped up in an enigma and then for good measure buried deep beneath the surface  

 

Part of believing that there maybe a cypher based on numbers means it has been essential to attach importance to numbers.  A simple code can be formed by simply assigning a number to a letter.  Another way that Jane Austen clearly knew was to write in code was to write the message in reverse.  These two methods are relatively easy to solve  but to make something harder to solve then the twists and turns of   complexity must be used and Jane Austen's understanding of  creative complexity in the above  is inescapable.

In the near future I will be attempting to interest someone with cryptographic analyst skills  to have a closer look.  Something given the above re Eighty and Eighth    the sequence 1,2,3,6 and 10 and 1,4, 5 and 20, the use of all numbers between 1 and twenty and multiples of ten between ten and a hundred.  include the descriptions pertaining to    Vingt  -  un  and "Evil to come"  described above.  Something deeply mysterious is  clearly going on.

 

 

The second part of believing that there maybe something coded within is the text and context of where the word cypher appears in Northanger Abbey.  This is in chapter 21 and in the second paragraph.   Catherine is in her apartment and notices an old cedar chest.  Closer inspection reveals to her what looks like a "cypher"   We are told that she cannot believe the last letter to be a T but whatever else could it be in the Tilney household.  Might this not be Jane Austen's way of introducing the fact of a hidden cypher and the key . 

T is the twentieth letter in the alphabet.  A very simple cypher could be created simply by changing letters for numbers.  However if there is a cypher it will not be simple to unravel.  One change that Jane Austen could make might be swapping around the values of the first 10 letters .  Instead of A equalling 1  A would equal 10.  Somewhere she mentions the phrase ten to one.  For the letters in that case A would equal 10 and J  (significant?)  would be 1.  Perhaps the same for K to T.  ( What do I know of codebreaking ? Zilch)

Two of Jane Austen's brothers were officers in the British navy.  Francis in particular rising to senior levels during Jane Austen's life.  In his capacity as a senior officer he must one would think have known something of coding messages.   Is it possible is it likely that Jane Austen learnt much about coding messages via him.  Would he have known  very much about French Napoleonic war codes?  A senior naval officer. Yes, one would think he did.  Could he have passed them on to Jane Austen.  Why not?        

 

 

Whilst reading through Northanger Abbey I am struck by just how many numerical  references there  are;  a thousand plus at least.  Not just actual numbers though.  There are so many words to which a  numerical value  can be ascribed whether it is to one quarter,  quarter of an hour, which could give either a quarter or fifteen or sixty.  What about for example  half an hour.  Then there is first, single, only, second, third,  or what about a couple, and a few.  Or what about a week, where  either one or seven for the number of days or a fortnight, twelvemonth,  circle, centre, middle, nothing;  etc.  There really are  well in excess of a thousand.  Could something be hidden within.  Of course it can if you have the ingenuity and creative talent to do it.  (Was Jane Austen a creative genius the like of which appears every five hundred years? )   It might also explain the groupings together for example successions of ones, twos, fours,  eights, nines, and forties the number thirteen or the words with a numerical value such as fortnight each of which in the space of ten lines or so is mentioned four times.  Then there is the number four in chapter 6 of P and P earlier explained.  Or to pick a couple of examples used in  Emma  "five couples" and "ten Couples"  Maybe I have found all there is to be found in relation to numbers but I dont think so; not  for a nano - second.  Anyone who can hide a word with such difficulty to find as  EIGHTH can hide a lot more besides  if they so choose. 

 

I am a little surprised that nobody appears to have studied Jane Austen's use of numbers especially her inclination for the curious perhaps unique usage of repetitions within a short piece of text.   Its done so often.  It must be done for a reason/s.  Why have they been ignored.  Did nobody not notice them, or is that nobody really knew what to make of them?  Northanger Abbey especially makes great use of numbers and numerical terms.  Many Many Hundreds.

Persuasion

 

Persuasion as with Northanger Abbey delivered a fruitful harvest once I started looking for anagrams that might involve 2 changes or deletion of letters.    Some were especially pleasing to find for example  Shepherd,  Mackenzie and Shirley.  Most if not all names can now be found contained in an anagram puzzle.  Listing as with Northanger Abbey and P and P in order of appearance  is for me at least the quickest and easiest way to present them.  As with Northanger Abbey there are  several shorter names ie. Croft who could be found by exchanging two letters from two small words to create Croft but for now they are left out.  

Shepherd  Chapter 3 Final Paragraph  The text below 

"Mr. Shepherd.... HE,PERHAPS "  Just exchange the A in perhaps for a D and delete a P to make Shepherd . 

 

Mackenzie   Chapter 5  Paragraph 34 

This looked impossible on my first reading but after Jackson and Robinson had been found hidden in part of one word and all of another I looked with greater hope the moment I saw Elizabeth.  Ah ha.  The letter Z .      The relevant text below 

" Mackenzie trying to understand, and MAKE  him understand which of  ELIZAbeth's plants"

Exchange the A in MAKE for a C  and the L in ELIZA for an  N and that can create Mackenzie.   

Added 19  July 2020

Copyright Nigel  King

 

 

The Miss Hayters  Chapter 8  4th Paragraph from the end

The Miss Hayters, the females of the family of cousins already mentioned, were apparently admitted to the honour of being in love with him; and as for Henrietta and Louisa, they both seemed so entirely occupied by him, that nothing but the continued appearance of goodwill between themselves should have made it credible that they were not decided  RIVALS  (Hayters or rather haters) 

Spicers  Chapter 9 Paragraphs 13, 14 and 15

This anagram based upon the name Spicers is spread over 3 paragraphs.  The anagram to be found by exchanging the C of Spicers for a T to make the word PRIESTS  In the first of these Charles Hayter we are told is looked down upon because he is  " nothing but a country curate "

There is nothing of relevance in the middle paragraph.  In the third paragraph is this sentence.  " It would not be a great match for Henrietta, but Charles has a very fair chance through the Spicers  (priests) of getting something from the

B I S H O P "    

Dr. Shirley  Chapter 9  paragraph 19  The relevant text below

"of HIS belonging to their DEAR  Dr. Shirley"

Exchange the D and A of DEAR for an L and Y to make Shirley 

 

Mrs. Shirley  Chapter 12  Paragraph 2  The relevant text below

 

"both for HIMSELF and Mrs Shirley/"

Exchange the M and F from HIMSELF for an L and Y to make Shirley again 

 

Harville  Chapter 14  Paragraph 3 

 

The phrase "HER EVILS "  by exchanging the E in Her for an A and the S in Evils for an L can create the name Harville 

 

Miss Hamilton   Chapter 17  Paragraph 6  The relevant text below 

 

"well grown Miss Hamilton, IN ALL THE   glow " 

Exchange an L in All and the E in The for an M and O to make Hamilton

 

Captain Brigden   Chapter  18  Paragraph 30  The relevant text below. 

This is a rather better anagram than my earlier, embarrassing effort 

"But here comes A FRIEND,  Captain Brigden"

Exchange the A for a B  and the F of friend for a G to make a much better anagram puzzle for Brigden.

Miss Atkinson   Another of those one off whats the point of this character harder  to spot anagrams.  Chapter 19  Paragraph 20 The relevant text below and the relevant words in block capitals

" Yes, and Miss Atkinson , who dined with him ONCE AT the Wallises, says he is the most agreeable man she ever was IN company with" 

Exchange the C and E from Once for a K and S to make the name Atkinson

Captain Wentworth  Chapter 19  Paragraph 37  The relevant text below. 

It would have been disappointing to have not found an anagram puzzle for Wentworth.

 

"TO BE THROWN into company with Captain Wentworth"

 

Exchange the O from To  or the B from Be for a W and delete the other to make Wentworth.

Hayter  Chapter 23  Paragraph  5  The relevant text below

 

" my brother Hayter HAD MET "

Exchange the D from Had for an R   and the M from Met for a Y to make Hayter

I am sure there are others especially the shorter names but for now  That is it.

Numbers  in Persuasion

Nothing quite so striking as the number sequences found in chapter 1 and chapter 3  of Northanger Abbey or the Easter Egg in  chapter 6 in P and P but just as in Northanger Abbey.

 

Every number between one and ten is to be found

     "           "               "          Ten and Twenty is to be found

 Zero in the form of none or nothing,  quarter and half are all easily found but an Eighth just as in Northanger Abbey has been hidden in anagram form.  

Every  multiple of ten to one hundred is to be found but Seventy is a little  subtle and requires explaining. 

Carefully as I looked the word Seventy appeared not to be found in the direct form of the word seventy.  But logically if all the other numbers are there it must be there  if not directly, then hidden.  And sure enough seventy is hidden.  Here is how

The word Seventeen.  Delete the N from Seventeen and a group of letters that sounds like Seventy remains.  

 

Eighth      Chapter 1  Paragraph 11

The word eighth is not directly named but an anagram of Eighth  is found using one word twice in Persuasion.   For the word  Eighth according to the Scrabble Word Finder there is only one direct anagram and that is the word Height.  This word occurs once in Persuasion.  This is the only way that I can find to make the word Eighth.  But given the difficult process to find Eighth in Northanger Abbey this, it must be said is far less of a strain to find. 

 

Added  21 July 2020 

Copyright Nigel King 

Pride and Prejudice

 

P and P was completed in draft form at least before Northanger Abbey and Persuasion.  Authors develop themes and ideas over time.  So, although numbers are used throughout P and P then quite possibly there wont be as much in quantity or so easily spotted.   Reassuringly though some similar  number lists can be found 

Numbers One to Ten are all found 

Numbers  Eleven to Twenty are not all found Seventeen and Nineteen are either not there or I missed them.  

To my delight I find that there are halves, quarters and one example of  three - quarters.  There ought somewhere to be at least one EIGHTH.  And there in  Chapter 1 Volume 3 is  the following phrase.

"half a quarter mile behind"

Half of a quarter of a mile is of course an EIGHTH. 

As with Persuasion and Northanger Abbey judging by the enormous quantity of numerical terms and usage there is plenty of scope for one with the ability of Jane Austen to conceal a little more. 

Mansfield Park 

Before re-reading  I predict to myself that numbers one to twenty  and multiples of 10 between ten and a hundred will appear somewhere in the text and that zero and the fractions half, quarter, three - quarters and especially an EIGHTH although I fully expect the EIGHTH to be hidden.  

Numbers one to twenty do appear although I skipped a little forwards to find the last number I was waiting for  number fourteen. 

As hoped for the multiples of ten between ten and a hundred do appear but eighty and ninety have to be realised in a two plus two equals four fashion.. Ninety comes from use of the "phrase hour and a half"  which of course is NINETY minutes.  Eighty is a bit harder and comes from the amount of speeches that Rushworth must learn "two and forty" is the  phrase to be considered  2 x 40 = 80

Zero, quarter, half, and three - quarters all duly appeared and then lastly so did an Eighth although it was hidden in the phrases below from Chapter 9 Volume 1

"and it could not be more than a furlong in length"

" Oh ! I know nothing of your furlongs"

A furlong in Britain was a well recognised unit of measured distance  in the days of imperial measurements.  It represented 220 yards and was an EIGHTH of a mile. 

According to the Jane Austen Thesaurus Jane Austen used the words FURLONG and its plural FURLONGS only once for each word .  Given Jane Austen's predilection for distances it is significant surely, that the sole use of each word is in the two phrases above. 

Another "Eighth" for those who missed or did not know what a furlong was, was to be found in mention of Shakespeares play Henry the VIII or  "Henry the EIGHTH"

That something is going on in Jane Austen's work in relation to words with a numerical value is I think utterly inescapable.  But what exactly ?  By the time I have worked out the above in Mansfield Park there are still two hundred pages of text left  with hundreds of  words with a numerical value.  There is scope for the skilled artist to hide something for a later generation to discover.  To hide, as I have explained, the word Eighth in Northanger Abbey for in excess of two hundred  years and with the ingenuity with which it has been concealed  takes a supremely accomplished degree of sublime skill.  It begs the question as to whether someone who has that level of ability has hidden anything else.  And I would say "without a doubt  there is more to be found" 

 

To use the word cypher is a hint at least that there maybe something else encoded within.  Personally I think of course there is more;  just got to work it out. 

 

This though is beyond my capabilities.  It requires a computer and an expert to use it to find anything that maybe  hidden.  

 

It would be fascinating, instructive even  to give to a professional code breaker the text of Northanger Abbey,  explain that the numbers  one to twenty are to be found within in the text, as are the multiples of ten from ten to a hundred.  Then tell him/her  that the numbers zero, a half, quarter, and three quarters are also there and  easily seen but missing or rather not easily seen  from the text is the next word in the sequence, an EIGHTH  but hidden within the text is the word EIGHTH.  Can he/she  find it? How long will he/she take. 

Is it possible as I suggest earlier that she knew  something of the British Navy war codes  and developed  ways of making them much harder to solve.  Its more likely though  that she was informed of the codes the French used.  Either the simpler and easier to break "Portugeuse code" or the later and more complex "Grand Chiffre"  If there is a code within Jane Austen's works I suspect that it is based on one of these.  But I strongly suspect that any code to be found will

 

a) be much harder to solve because of improvements or alterations to it by Jane Austen 

and 

b) Before it can be solved completely at least one  anagram puzzle somewhere will be found

c) It is also possible that these anagram puzzles may also be linked in some way.  For sure I would not wish to rule this possibility out without checking. 

d) invented her own code  

Its taken over two hundred years for anything to do with the possible  existence of a code within her work to appear.  But  I have heard mention that some believe there is some sort of code within some of her work.  Personally I think its a dead cert.    If there is a code, then  where on the scale of difficulty in relation to solving 19th century codes would this appear?  Near the top surely because nobody has found it yet.   

Finally as an incidental question.  Did either of her brothers ever suggest ways of making codes harder to solve because if they did then possibly the ideas were not their own. 

Added 24 July 2020 

Copyright Nigel  King  

Emma

Emma of course needed the same further scrutiny as the other novels have undergone.  Would many more anagram puzzles be found?   Of course they were.

Would any further interesting numerical arrangements  similar to those found in other novels also be found?  "They were.  "Would any " eighths"  be found?"  They were.

 

Every number between one  and twenty is used although it was not until near the end that number thirteen was used.

 

Zero in the form of either nothing or none was found.   As were  three- quarters, half, quarter and, as I would have betted  an eighth.  In fact two eighths were found.  In the same paragraph the actual word E I G H T H  was used twice. 

There is also the same usage of a single number four or more  times within a single paragraph.  Why would that happen.  Its somehow not a natural way of expression.  Once or twice maybe but again and again and again,  novel after novel.  Look at how often in Emma for example the phrase five couples is used or for that matter ten couples.  Look at how often groups of the same number appear especially one.  Often four times in a single paragraph time after time.  I cannot think of another writer who uses numbers or words with a numerical value in the same way.  But you might need to if you were inserting a coded message!!!

Before pointing out the further invariably clever anagrams most recently found in Emma I thought I would have  have a quick look at The Watsons and Sanditon and see whether anything similar with numbers could be seen taking place.  The Watsons although only a very short  novel fragment four chapters in all and therefore one would think  least likely to produce anything of value, but value was found.  Every number between one and ten  is used.   Several numbers between ten and twenty are also used in these few chapters and it does not seem improbable that had the whole work been completed the others would also have been used.   Furthermore zero in the form of none and  half and quarter were also used.  No example of an eighth in reality or to be found was found but once again and with three quarters or more for a projected novel still to be written  that is not to say that more  would not have been had the novel been finished.

Sanditon was  similarly  fruitful.  The numbers between one and ten were all used but between   ten  and twenty were not all used,  but zero, three - quarters, half and quarter were all used and in an example of deja-vu so to speak (Pride and Prejudice to be precise) an eighth was also to be found by the use of almost exactly the same phrase  "half of a quarter of a mile" ie. an eighth.

Is something a little unusual  going on.   OF COURSE IT IS !!!  

Added 12 August 2020

Copyright Nigel King

Emma and Anagrams

 

I was very pleased with this further search for anagrams based around  names that I undertook.  A number of anagrams based around names that I had especially hoped to  find were found.  They include Woodhouse, Knightley and the particularly pleasing Churchill.  I admit to being a bit fortunate to find Churchill.  Missed initially, it was found whilst looking for something else altogether.  Mainly I am only listing the anagrams found that pertain to longer names if 2 letters need to be  changed.  I include a few shorter names for example Taylor and Weston  which require the change of 2 letters  just to show that these also exist. The relevant words that undergo change are in capitals   If there are any that require only 1 change of letter these will be shown when and where they occur.  I suspect regretfully  some to have been missed.

 

Taylor  Chapter 1  Paragraph 11  The relevant text below

"TO PART  with Miss Taylor"  Exchange the T from To and the P from Part for a Y and L to make Taylor  

 

Weston  Chapter 1  Paragraph 43  The relevant text below

"if Mr Weston WERE TO  marry her"   Exchange R and E from Were for a N and S to make Weston.

Elton  Chapter 1 paragraph  47  The relevant text below

" Mr Elton , and this is THE ONLY "  Delete the H from The and the Y from Only to make Elton

Churchill   Chapter 2   Paragraph 2  The relevant text below. 

"Miss Churchill fell in love with him, nobody was surprised except her brother and his wife, who had never seen him, and were FULL of pride and importance WHICH the connection would offend"  Exchange the F from full and the W from which for a C and and R to make Churchill.

 

A key character is F.C.Weston Churchill with a name not easy  to conceal in a puzzle.  It did not look easy to find an  anagram puzzle for F.C.Churchill.  There were a few false hopes dashed. Found by chance when I started looking with more care at the first two words of each chapter.  The first two words in block capitals which I have earlier mentioned contain deeper meaning than might initially be  thought.  ie Some appear to be anagram puzzles similar in construction to those based around names.  Whilst looking at other chapter beginnings it occurred to me that very often the first two words encapsulated  what the chapter was about.  For example chapter 1 begins with Emma Woodhouse and that chapter if it is about anything is about Emma Woodhouse.  Similarly with chapter 2 which begins Mr. Weston and is a brief introduction to the man who is Mr. Weston.  In this chapter we first learn of Mr. Weston's son Frank Churchill and the location of the puzzle above. 

Martin   Chapter 4  Paragraph 5  The relevant text below 

"Mr. Martin, who bore a PART IN the narrative"  Very simple.  Just exchange the P in Part for an M to make Martin.

Elton  Chapter 4  Paragraph  42  The relevant text below. 

Most of the shorter names I have not included for now unless there is only 1 letter to be changed or there is a special quality about them  as in this case there are 3 anagrams to be found in just a few phrases.

"to take Mr. Elton as a MODEL.  Mr. Elton is good humoured. cheerful obliging and GENTLE.  He seems to me, to be grown particularly GENTLE of late"  In the first example an exchange of the M and D from Model for an N and T makes Elton .  In the duplicate examples of Gentle either delete the G or E and exchange the other for an O to make Elton.  

Catherine  Chapter 9  Paragraph  62  The relevant text below

"christened Catherine"  Exchange the S or D from Christened for an A and delete the other to make Catherine.  In my opinion one of the  best involving the name Catherine.    Why use the name Catherine in this instance when one of umpteen other names are available unless to make the anagram puzzle.  Catherine a very fertile name in terms of creating anagram puzzles and the above one is  too good not to include somewhere and I suspect realised too late too put in any other of her novels. 

Perry  Chapter  12  Paragraph  5th from the end  The relevant text below

" This is just what Perry said.  It seemed to him A VERY ill judged measure",  Exchange the A of A   and V of Very for a P and E to make Perry.

 

  Elton  Chapter 13  Paragraph  13  The relevant text below

"What a strange thing love is, he (Mr. Elton ) can see ready wit in Harriet , but will not dine ALONE for her ."  No need I hope to explain again.   

Elton  Chapter 13  Paragraph  21  The relevant text below 

" Mr. Elton IN LOVE with me"  Exchange the I in In or the V in Love for a T and delete the other to make Elton

Elton  Chapter   13  Paragraph 28  The relevant text below 

"the step was LET DOWN, and Mr. Elton "  Delete the D and W from Down to make Elton.  Or I suppose exchange the D and W for an M and R to make Mr. Elton.

 

Elton's  Chapter 14  Paragraph  4  The relevant Text below

" period of Mr. Elton's nonsense, which she particularly wished to LISTEN to"  Exchange the I in Listen for an O to make Elton's

 

Woodhouse  Chapter 15  Paragraph  4   

 

This paragraph produces almost the same  anagram puzzle  3 times in a way  almost exactly like Catherine and  the repetition of "A VERY NICE"  produces an the same anagram puzzle 3 times.  The difference is that 3 letters need to change.  Given also the anagram puzzle outlined involving the words Panegyric and Ignorance and the name Catherine  I feel this should be included  Combine this with the fact that emphasis has been implied  by repetition and I think it essential to include this.  The relevant text below 

 

 

"WOULD NOT SHE give him her support? - WOULD NOT SHE add her persuasions to his to induce Miss Woodhouse not to go to Mrs. Goddard's, till it were certain that Miss Smith's disorder had no infection?  He could not be satisfied without a promise - WOULD NOT SHE give him her influence in procuring it"   Delete the L and N from Would and Not and exchange the T from Not for an O to make Woodhouse.  It is also possible to make the name Woodhouse by deleting the L and T instead from Would and Not and exchanging the N for an O. 

Mrs Weston  Chapter 15  Paragraph 8  The relevant text below

"a STORM of SNOW"  Exchange the O  from storm or snow for an E and Mrs. Weston can be made. 

The storm of snow in this case occurs while an evening of  dining has taken place at the Weston's 

Westons    Chapter 15  Paragraph  15 

There are a few possibilities here.  N.B. the words Likely And Thing.   Firstly no anagram is possible from VERY LIKELY .  Secondly  To make the name Knightley  from Nothing and Likely it is required that the first two letters of each word be deleted.  Not that one then.  But  Confusion ? Thirdly  from the words Likely and Than   delete either  L from Likely and the A from Than and exchange the other for a G to make Knightley.  Fourthly  from Likely and Thing  Delete the L and I from Likely to make Knightley. 

Knightley's   Chapter   26 Paragraph  67 The relevant text below

" I cannot consent at all to Mr. Knightley's marrying; and I am sure it is not at all LIKELY.   I am amazed that you should think of such a THING.   Delete either the L or I from Likely and exchange the other to make Knightley's.  More confusion with the use of the word think and using think with either likely or thing to make Knightley

 

Knightley Chapter 26  Paragraph  81  The relevant text below.  Here we go again 

"But I do not think it is at all a LIKELY  THING for him to do.  Too many letters to change from Think and Likely  to make the name Knightley   But   delete the L from Likely and the I from either Likely or Thing to make Knightley.  Once again the word think is also used and for which the possibility as above of an anagram puzzle is not to be found.   

Chapter  29

I feel it worth mentioning this chapter and its extraordinary use of numbers.  What the significance is if anything I have no idea. But!  The phrase five couples is used seven times and the phrase ten couples is used four times.

 

Chapter 30  Paragraph 1

 

In the 1st edition of Emma this chapter begins with the first two words in block capitals  ONE THING.  Delete the E from One and the word Nothing can be made.  The word nothing appears in this  opening paragraph "NOTHING could be properly ready until the third week" and although" One thing only is wanting to make the prospect of a ball completely satisfactory to Emma"  the ball does not happen. 

Larkins   Chapter 30  Paragraph  41  The relevant text below

"He may spend the evening with DEAR William Larkins now if he LIKES " Exchange the D or E from Dear for an N and delete the other

 

 Knightley  Chapter 32  Paragraph  The text below

"I like him (Knightley) VERY much. Decidedly I THINK .  Exchange the V and R from Very  for a G and L to make Knightley.  

Chapter 34 This chapter  contains two of the uses of the word EIGHTH in one paragraph 

Knightley  Chapter 36  Paragraph 41   

Two word combinations  VERY and THINK and LIKELY and THINK used before   The relevant text below

"That is VERY  LIKELY.  (said Mr Knightley)   You THINK so, do you not. 

Isabella  Chapter 36  4th paragraph from the end

 

"every letter to Isabella brought an account of fresh gaieties; dinners at Mr. Cole's, or BALLS at THE Crown ."  Exchange the T and H from The for an I and A to make Isabella.

Added 16 August 2020

Copyright Nigel King 

Woodhouse  Chapter  38  Paragraph  19  

It is debatable whether this should be included.  It is the phrase used by Miss Bates to Miss Woodhouse "How do you do?"  To make Woodhouse requires two exchanges of letters and a deletion of another.  Delete either the D O or Y and exchange the other 2 for an S and E to make Woodhouse.  I include it because this phrase is used FIVE times in the course of approx.  twenty lines.  ie .  very often 

It is also interesting to consider the letters that are used to create this anagram.  Y O D E S.  The Scrabble Word Finder gives dozens of five letter results to be found when a question mark is added.  However one of these possibilities does  especially worth noting.  The word to note by exchanging the Y for a C  is C O D E S.  Deliberate?  Is Jane Austen  giving clues that not only is there a code but that there are codes. I would say so.       

 

 

Woodhouse  Chapter 38  Paragraph  48  The relevant text below 

"Miss Woodhouse WHO WOULD BE SO"   Delete either W from Who or Would and the B from Be to make Woodhouse.

Knightley  Chapter 40  Paragraph  19  The relevant text below

"TALKING about spruce beer. - Oh YES - Mr Knightley."  Delete the A from talking or the S from Yes and exchange the other for an H to make Knightley.

Knightley  Chapter 42  Paragraph  27 

A repeat of a previously used puzzle  containing the words VERY and THING 

Knightley  Chapter 42  Paragraph  27  The relevant text below

"yes I see what she means (turning to Mr. Knightley) and I will try to hold my tongue.  I must MAKE myself VERY disagreeable, or she would not have said such a THING to an old friend"  Two puzzles in one Very and Thing as used twice before and Make and Thing.  Exchange the M and A for an L and Y to make Knightley

Sucklings  Chapter  44  Paragraph  25   The relevant text below. 

 

To find this pun requires a little lateral thinking.   If one exchanges the S of Sucklings for a D one makes the word Ducklings.

"A style of living almost equal to Maple Grove - and as to the children except the little SUCKLINGS "  Well I liked it.

 

Added 17 August 2020

Copyright Nigel King 

Abdy's  Chapter 44  Paragraph 31  The relevant text below

"he (Abdy) IS BED - ridden "  Exchange the  A from Is and the E from Bed for an A and a  Y to make Abdy's 

Elton  Chapter 45  Paragraph  4th from the end  The relevant text below

 

" Mrs. Elton, indeed could NOT BE  denied"  Exchange the  B from Be for an L to make Elton.  In this phrase it should also be noted that INDEED is an anagram of DENIED.  Did Jane Austen realise that.  I would imagine she did.

Otways  (specifically Frank Otway )  Chapter 46  Paragraph  21  The relevant text below 

" He  (Frank Otway)  is half WAY TO  Windsor"  Way To is a straightforward anagram of Otway. 

 

Larkins  Chapter 51  Paragraphs 33 and 34  The relevant text below 2 anagrams in 1 short excerpt 

"he had been WALKING  away from William Larkins,  the whole morning, to have his thoughts to himself    

    "Ah! there is one difficulty, unprovided for, " cried Emma.  "I am sure William Larkins will not like it.  You must get his consent before you ASK MINE. The first can be made by  exchanging the W and G from Walking for an R and S to make Larkins.  The second by exchanging the M and E from Mine for an L and R to make Larkins.

Donwell  Chapter 52  Paragraph  27  The relevant text below 

" gone ON foot to Donwell? - HE WILL"  Exchange the H from He for a D and delete the I from Will to make Donwell.

 

Donwell  Chapter 52  Paragraph  39 and 40 The relevant text below

"When I got to Donwell, " said he, "Knightley could not be found.  Very odd!  very unaccountable!  after the note I sent him this morning, and the message he returned, that he should certainly be home at home TILL ONE."

    "Donwell cried his wife"  Exchange the T and I from Till for a W and D to make Donwell 

 

Knightley  Chapter  52  Final  Paragraph  The relevant text below

"Did not THINK him at all in LOVE - not in the least ?  Poor Knightley!"  Exchange the O and V from Love for a G and Y to make Knightley.

What a lot of fun Jane Austen has had with the name knightley 

 

Astley  Chapter 54  Paragraph  20  The relevant text below

"They were going to take the two ELDEST boys to Astley's"  Exchange the D and an E from Eldest for an A and Y to make Astley

Emma  Chapter  54  Paragraph  22  The relevant text below 

"Emma - You laugh AT ME"  Exchange the T from At for an M to make AMME or EMMA in reverse.

Selina  Chapter  55  Final paragraph. 

 Exactly what Selina is doing in the final paragraph is I think a  very pertinent question that demands an answer.  A woman who says nothing, does nothing, affects the plot in no way ,shape, or form, given the honour of appearing in the last paragraph.    There are 2 anagrams in this final paragraph.   The relevant text below

"very little whitE SATIN  very few lace VEILS;  A   most pitiable business - Selina " 

The first two words of this quote I have put underlined.  Cryptic crossword puzzle solvers will recognise this expression and the need of using a small amount of the word WHITE.  So using the E from White and exchanging the T from Satin for an L to make Selina.  The second anagram is found by exchanging the V from Veils for an N and using the A  to make Selina. 

 

Why these  two anagrams of Selina in the final paragraph.  Is there something further to be found.  This is just a theory  of mine.  There are six letters in these two anagram puzzles.   Is it possible that in some way this is a coded way of saying  THE END.  Just a thought. 

In conclusion 

  

*There are, I am sure, many anagrams that I have missed in all Jane Austen's works that I have missed.   I would say that this is because  there are so many of them  and some so clever.   I would also suggest that it is an intention or hope  of Jane Austen's that  some might be missed. 

 

Fifty anagrams or more utilizing one name (Catherine ). Eight on one page (Catherine). Three in one paragraph (Catherine).  Never mind all the other names from which an anagram puzzle can be found.  Anagram puzzles from which a pun is also to be observed.  So clever, such artful ingenuity,  simple enough in concept to understand and yet  complex  enough and hidden with such skill that nobody has seen them.  There are so many that surely even the most diehard sceptic has to admit that there comes a time when it has to be conceded that these  cannot appear by chance. 

 

There are many more  anagram puzzles using two changes of letters to make a six letter or shorter name name ie . HER SON / THORPE  which in general I have not listed.   

Something, surely is going on with numbers.  I feel sure I have only scratched the surface.  I am not smart enough to work out whether actual codes if any exist in the short to mid term  but as I review Jane Austen's prolific usage of numbers and words with a numerical / mathematical value I would be amazed if there is nothing coded  or hidden somehow within.   

 

It would also amaze me   given Panegyric / Ignorance and the hiding of the word EIGHTH and Jane Austen's love of anagrams  that  if there  is anything coded then  before it can be solved some more anagrams will have to solved too.

When it comes to the real life identity of Mr. Darcy I may not have  the absolute, irrefutable proof to satisfy the likes of Maureen Stiller that Mr. Darcy  is Robert Cary Elwes, but there is, as one individual put it, a surfeit of evidence to support my case.  And frankly in finding anagram puzzles from which his name derives and for which no other ready anagram solution appears in the text to explain these choices of name,  and furthermore that had I not realised the possibility of hiding the name Cary /Darcy nothing further would have materialised in respect of anagram and numerical  puzzles.     I beg to suggest that I have come very close !!!   

 

And all of this hidden for 200 years. 

 

                                                            

                                           A B S O L U T E L Y     E X T R A O R D I N A R Y

 

 

Added 20  August  2020

Copyright Nigel King  

In late February it occurred to me that a further code could possibly be concealed within Jane Austen's work.  It is an inescapable fact that  Jane Austen makes  an unusual if not extraordinary and extensive use of italics in her work.  A quick examination shows a range from almost zero in the last half of Persuasion to in excess of 30 in just one chapter (18) of Mansfield Park.  I'm yet to look at Emma at the time of writing but I'm expecting similar prolific use.  Furthermore is her use of words and phrases in other languages especially again in Mansfield Park of relevance.   Which other author uses italics with such frequency ?  Its easy sometimes to look at these words and question whether  some of them really needed to be in italics.  In which case Why? are there so many  in italics ?  Not for nothing.  Does Jane Austen do things for no good reason.   NO.  

 

Added  26  February  2021

Copyright Nigel  King